Tag Archives: Free Education

Best of Ted Talks II

I have spent another week watching Ted speakers, artists and musicians and once again, here I have to present to you the best of the Ted Talks which I have found.  Hope you enjoy.

5. Ahn Trio: A modern take on piano, violin, cello

The three Ahn sisters (cellist Maria, pianist Lucia, violinist Angella) breathe new life into the piano trio with their passionate musicmaking. At TEDWomen, they start with the bright and poppy “Skylife,” by David Balakrishnan, then play a gorgeous, slinky version of “Oblivion,” by Astor Piazzolla.

4. Jason Fried: Why work doesn’t happen at work

Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn’t a good place to do it. At TEDxMidwest, he lays out the main problems (call them the M&Ms) and offers three suggestions to make work work.

3. Renny Gleeson on antisocial phone tricks

In this funny (and actually poignant) 3-minute talk, social strategist Renny Gleeson breaks down our always-on social world — where the experience we’re having right now is less interesting than what we’ll tweet about it later.

2. Jacqueline Novogratz: Inspiring a life of immersion

We each want to live a life of purpose, but where to start? In this luminous, wide-ranging talk, Jacqueline Novogratz introduces us to people she’s met in her work in “patient capital” — people who have immersed themselves in a cause, a community, a passion for justice. These human stories carry powerful moments of inspiration.

1. Jamie Oliver’s TED Prize wish: Teach every child about food

Sharing powerful stories from his anti-obesity project in Huntington, W. Va., TED Prize winner Jamie Oliver makes the case for an all-out assault on our ignorance of food.

If you liked this post and want to see others like it, read: The Best of Ted Talks I, and Ted Talks: Musicians

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The Best of Ted Talks

S.C. Barrus, S. Cody Barrus, Away and AwaySo here are a few of the best Ted Talks from recent memory.  If you haven’t seen Ted Talks before, make sure you check out their site because it is the best site on the internet (if you disagree, show me one better).  It is essentially videos of experts in their fields talking about what is important to them, be it culture, oceanography, education, music, arts, etc.  So, here it is, my personal top five Ted Talks (which I have seen, and not yet covered):

5. Nigel Marsh: How to Make Work-Life Balance Work

Work-life balance, says Nigel Marsh, is too important to be left in the hands of your employer. At TEDxSydney, Marsh lays out an ideal day balanced between family time, personal time and productivity — and offers some stirring encouragement to make it happen.

4. Amber Case: We Are All Cyborgs Now

Technology is evolving us, says Amber Case, as we become a screen-staring, button-clicking new version of homo sapiens. We now rely on “external brains” (cell phones and computers) to communicate, remember, even live out secondary lives. But will these machines ultimately connect or conquer us? Case offers surprising insight into our cyborg selves.

3. Martin Jacques: Understanding the Rise of China

Speaking at a TED Salon in London, economist Martin Jacques asks: How do we in the West make sense of China and its phenomenal rise? The author of “When China Rules the World,” he examines why the West often puzzles over the growing power of the Chinese economy, and offers three building blocks for understanding what China is and will become.

2. Dan Barber: How I Fell in Love With a Fish

Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu. With impeccable research and deadpan humor, he chronicles his pursuit of a sustainable fish he could love, and the foodie’s honeymoon he’s enjoyed since discovering an outrageously delicious fish raised using a revolutionary farming method in Spain.

1. Sylvia Earle’s TED Prize Wish to Protect Our Oceans

Legendary ocean researcher Sylvia Earle shares astonishing images of the ocean — and shocking stats about its rapid decline — as she makes her TED Prize wish: that we will join her in protecting the vital blue heart of the planet.

Farewell from S.C.B.

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A Quote by Stephen Colbert

“Don’t be afraid to be a fool. Remember, you cannot be both young and wise. Young people who pretend to be wise to the ways of the world are mostly just cynics. Cynicism masquerades as wisdom, but it is the farthest thing from it. Because cynics don’t learn anything. Because cynicism is a self-imposed blindness, a rejection of the world because we are afraid it will hurt us or disappoint us. Cynics always say no. But saying yes begins things. Saying yes is how things grow. Saying yes leads to knowledge. “Yes” is for young people. So for as long as you have the strength to, say yes.”

Stephen Colbert, via Dave

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Yale – Free Online Video Courses

S.C. Barrus, S. Cody Barrus, Away and AwayFor those of you who frequent this site, you may have noticed something about me.  I love to learn.  I love to learn because it expands my knowledge of this crazy world we live in.  I love to learn because now a days knowledge is literally power, and because knowledge is now available free to the every man, which means we the people, with only a little effort, can be truly powerful.

Here is an ironic fact, I have learned more on the internet than I ever learned in college.  And the what I find on the net is not increasing in price by 25% a year.

In the ’60’s people opened their minds with LSD, today people prefer that their minds remain closed while they watch television.  Be strange, be weird, turn off that damned TV now and then and learn something.

Here’s a good way to start.  Free Yale Courses. You don’t have to pay a penny, and you too can receive one of the greatest educations that this planet has to offer.  You wont get that expensive slip of paper, but that’s all bureaucracy anyway, it’s the learnin’ that’s important.

They have free courses in Astronomy , Biomedical Engineering , Chemistry , Classics , Ecology and Evolutionary Biology , Economics , English , History , History of Art , Italian Language and Literature , Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology , Music , Philosophy , Physics , Political Science , Psychology , and  Religious Studies .

My advice, take is slow and take one class at a time, one or two lectures a week.  No need to rush, but as long as you are even passively participating, you are progressing, and life is all about progression.

Related Posts: Ted Talks: Writers, Ted Talks: Musicians, Books Should Be Free, Book of the Month Club

Farewell from S.C.B.

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Books Should Be Free

If you have not yet found the website Books Should Be Free, especially if your short on pocket change these days, be sure you follow the link and check it out.  Essentially the title of the site speaks for itself, unlike the website you are currently visiting.  Books, after a certain amount of time, enter the public domain (they are owned by everybody, including you), which is how big publishers sell super cheap copies of these books at book stores, no royalties.  Why pay for something you already own?

That is were Books Should Be Free comes in.  Volunteers record themselves reading these books and give away the recordings.  Because it is all volunteers, and because there is no real filter for talent, the quality of these audio books varies from professional quality and perfect annunciation, to grainy audio of a kid who breaths with a wheeze.  However, by an large, I have had great luck on this site.

Books I have listened to for free include:


Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. A great book and a very good narration done by a single narrator which helps with continuity.

Treasure Island also by Robert Louis Stevenson. The quality varied from chapter to chapter, as each was read by a different narrator, my favorite appearing several times.

Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Nietzsche. Good quality if I remember correctly, but a difficult book to digest in audio format.

The Art of War by SUN TZU. Great quality, easy listen, surprisingly applicable to modern day living if you can think of it as a parable.  Its only an hour and a half long, and then you can say, “Yeah, I read The Art of War.”Collected Public Domain Works of H. P. Lovecraft, The by H. P. Lovecraft

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells. Good enough quality, interesting story, never finished it because my stereo was stolen before I had a chance.

The Collected Public Domain Works of H. P. Lovecraft by H.P. Lovecraft.  While I only listened to a couple of these before my stereo was stolen, what I heard was spot on considering the subject matter.

These are only a fraction of the books you can get for free.  I personally downloaded all the Sherlock Holmes stories, as well as Swiss Family Robinson, White Fang, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and many, many more.  Hope you find some cool titles there.  If you happen upon an excellent recording, be sure to comment.

TTFN


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